Brejk, or ponglish. Spike to each other in English

In the British Isles we are not talking to each other after Polish. We do not say it (yet) in English. The daily contacts we use for pol-ang-slang, or ponglish.

Brejk all rule – Marcin Świetlicki sings about the rebellion against the surrounding reality. This strange design language, in this case, is done on purpose, emphasizing the revolutionary attitude up to the principles of the native language.

However, in clusters of Poles staying abroad longer time processes leading to the formation of similar language behavior become involuntary. Here are examples of conversations overheard in the midst of living in the UK.

Neer on frajernicy

Initially meddling polarized English words appear as a form of a joke, like nicknamed fryer word “frajernica” from the English “fry” or fry, or calling a person working part-time “bungler”, as the phrase work part-time is in English “part-time”.

About ourselves more often say “Pollocks” instead of Poles, which is somewhat comical, but the contemptuous combination of the English words “Polls”, that is precisely the Poles, and “bollocks” or gently explaining “nonsense.”

Similarly humorous crack met widespread means of transport in London, which is often said that “we will go tube” because the metro in British English is the “tube”. Polonised names dorobiły also specific lines of the underground railway. Piccadilly Line “pika di lka” Central Line “ECU”.

Some names simply do not have the strength to explain. I mean, how to properly call the Polish “payslip”, ie a document with the calculation of how much is poured into our account and why so that every month we should handing employer. Who will say “office work” instead of “job center”? Maybe it’s because despite similar functions are quite dissimilar.

And what equivalent in The Polish language has a “council”? Council district? I think very few compatriots have in their contact experiences with this institution in Poland. Rather, already with the office of the city. And just the size of the entire Polish cities are neighborhoods, and consequently the levels of administrative formalities in London.

Tower me!

After some time, intensive contact with a foreign language, in conversations with fellow countrymen begins sometimes missing Polish words. Instinctively we replace them English. Nobody applies for employment. He “applied” from the English “apply”. But it is not a drug is administered.

Nobody goes to a job interview. Everyone has for this “interview”. And what to do with the Oyster Card or a phone card … well – “pre-paid”. Pay extra? Supplement? Doforsić? No, they must be “natopować” from the English “top up”. A construction worker, a favorite occupation of the Polish boys, it requires too much fraying language. Simply “Bilder”.

We are very “busy” because the UK does not sometimes longer just busy. In the city is terrible “traffic” because the term “movement” or “cap” very associated with the Polish, provincial idyll. Gradually, more and more we begin to compose sentences using the words Polish, but putting them together in a pattern, as if it existed in the rules of English grammar, or even alive translate English collocations.

“I’ll take the train” or “take the bus” can be heard more and more often, instead of “I’ll go by train or bus,” because what we say in English “to take train/bus.” Similarly, “we have sex” rather than to practice it. Preferably in the morning, when we “offa”, ie a day off from the English “day off”.

If only she followed the increasing proficiency in the English language. Unfortunately, getting richer vocabulary, what the effects of the above, but knowledge of the rules of language, idioms, and expressive connectivity is still limping. Trying to say something in English, we use the Polish word order, not knowing the proper expression, replace them with a direct carbon copy of the Polish language.

Perhaps we not say “Thanks from the mountain”, referring to the Polish “thank you in advance”, which in English should read “thank in advance”. Perhaps we will not say a “tower me” to mean “believe me” and referring to similar wording in Polish words “believe” and “tower”, which, unfortunately, in the English language are not similar to each other ( “is trust” and “tower”). So do not ośmieszymy, unless it was a joke.

It may be remembered that the English “ordinary” is not identical with the Polish “coarse” and means only “ordinary” and “hardly” means only, not hard, and we use it when someone or something “only” is any and not when it is such a large, or “hard” level. Not happened to us the situation, as in the joke about the Pole, who in the British store very long career goes to the vendor guessed that wants to buy the ball. The problem is that metal.

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